UNCTAD RELEASES CREATIVE ECONOMY REPORT 2008

06 May 2008
Accra (Ghana) - "The Creative Economy Report 2008 - The challenge of assessing the creative economy towards informed policy-making" is the first comprehensive study to present the United Nations perspective on this emerging topic. It includes significant statements on how design is reshaping the international world markets for creative goods and services.
Accra (Ghana) - "The Creative Economy Report 2008 - The challenge of assessing the creative economy towards informed policy-making" is the first comprehensive study to present the United Nations perspective on this emerging topic. This policy-oriented analysis is intended to facilitate a better understanding of the key issues underlying the emerging creative economy at national and international levels. It brings together contributions from five United Nations organizations, namely UNCTAD, UNDP UNESCO, WIPO and the International Trade Centre (ITC), in a joint endeavour to enhance policy coherence and international action in this area.

The development dimension is the guiding principle of this Report which aims to assist developing countries to harness their creative economies and to maximize trade and development gains by recognizing the creative economy as a feasible development option for linking economic, technological, social and cultural development objectives of our contemporary society.

The statistical annex presents first-hand trade data and pioneering analysis of international trade flows of creative goods and services in world markets.

"Design was found to be the leading subgroup in the world market for creative goods. The global market for these goods reached $218.1 billion in 2005, accounting for nearly half of total world exports of creative goods. The inclusion of design as a creative industry has completely changed the position of key players in the world market for creative goods and services."

- The Creative Economy Report 2008, p. 130


The 350-pages Report recognizes that creativity and human talent are fast becoming powerful engines for economic growth and development, and calls for the adoption of effective cross-cutting mechanisms and concerted inter-ministerial policy action.

It attempts to give a comprehensive view of fast-expanding global trade in goods and services ranging from traditional arts and crafts to books, newspapers, paintings, music and performing arts; technology-driven products such as film, design, audiovisual works, television, and radio; and "new media" products such as digital animation and videogames. Overall, creative goods made up 3.8% of total global trade in 2005. Rising affluence – resulting in more demand for entertainment – and technological progress that eases the diffusion of creative products indicate that the sector should continue to thrive and expand.

The report says developing countries in particular should find the creative industries fertile territory for growth. Art crafts currently account for 60% of the value of their creative exports. Design and new media products – especially as the Internet makes geography irrelevant for the delivery of many such goods – have great potential for nations in Asia, Africa, Latin America, and the Caribbean. The study adds that figures compiled for the more technology-intensive and services-oriented creative industries probably underestimate their current value. Also of great potential are further marketing and sales related to cultural celebrations and festivals.

The 350-pages Report recognizes that creativity and human talent are fast becoming powerful engines for economic growth and development, and calls for the adoption of effective cross-cutting mechanisms and concerted inter-ministerial policy action.



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